Archives For September 2018

The Briefing

Disaster Relief ramps up as Florence floodwater rises
As Hurricane Florence crashed ashore in North Carolina, rising floodwaters have cut off the supply chains of some Southern Baptist Disaster Relief efforts. Still, Southern Baptists have begun relief ministries and the Illinois Baptist Disaster Relief itself has 1,700 volunteers on standby who are specially trained to provide relief during times like these. As of Sept. 17, the storm dumped more than 30 inches of rain in some regions, resulting it at least 23 deaths and is moving northeast into Virginia.

Platt to step down from IMB; Meador named interim
IMB president, Dr. David Platt’s resignation is to be effective at the Sept. 27, 2018, trustee meeting. As such, the Executive Committee of the board of trustees of the International Mission Board voted in a special meeting Sept. 13 to approve Dr. Clyde Meador as interim president starting Sept. 27, subject to full board approval. Platt has served as president of the IMB since Aug. 27, 2014.

China: Bibles burning, churches closing
China’s government is ratcheting up a crackdown on Christian congregations in Beijing. In several provinces crosses have been destroyed, Bibles burned, churches shut down and followers ordered to sign papers renouncing their faith. The campaign corresponds with a drive to “Sinicize” religion by demanding loyalty to the officially atheist Communist Party and eliminating any challenge to its power over people’s lives. 

NYC to issue 3rd gender on birth certificates
New York City is the most recent city to allow a third gender option on birth certificates for persons who do not identify as male or female. The third gender marker on birth certificates will become effective Jan. 1, 2019 and will be classified as gender X. The new policy will no longer require persons who identify as such to provide a note from a doctor or a health care provider’s affidavit in order to make such a change. 

CO schools end sex ed program exposing porn
A Colorado school district has agreed to discontinue using products in their sex education program from a company parents say exposed their children to porn images. For two years, the Thomas More Society has assisted concerned parents in an effort to stop the Cherry Creek School District from using these products which were used by children in 55,000 elementary schools, middle schools and high schools across the United States.

Sources: Baptist Press, Illinois Baptist, News Channel 20, Religion News, Christian Post (2)

Andre DobsonAt Calvary Baptist Church, people are learning to share their faith in simple ways. Through those witnesses, people are coming to faith in Christ.

It’s what Pastor André Dobson calls “connecting the dots”—Christians learn to share their faith, those who hear the gospel and respond are saved, and God grows his church through the ministry of his people. At Calvary, evangelism training has played a key role. The church’s recent training process was led by Larry Rhodes, an IBSA zone consultant supported in part by giving to the Mission Illinois Offering.

It’s not too late to gather the offering. Visit www.missionIllinois.org for downloadable resources.

Developed by Southern Baptist leaders, 3 Circles is a simple way to communicate the truths of the gospel within everyday conversations.

Rhodes led the training on a Sunday evening, and around 150 people showed up, Dobson said. Since then, the pastor has seen “aha moments” happening in his church—people who had been uncomfortable or inexperienced in sharing their faith now have the tools to do so readily.

“People are coming to Christ because our people have been engaged to witness, simply because somebody took the time to say, ‘Here’s how you can do this,’” he said.
In April, Calvary baptized nine people on One GRAND Sunday, a statewide baptism emphasis that resulted in more than 650 baptisms. They’ve also been focused on small groups ministry, Dobson said, and have been able to start new groups this year, with more in the works.

One of Calvary’s leaders recently trained his group members in 3 Circles and then took the gospel—and a group of ready witnesses—to a local assisted living facility. They connected the dots, Dobson said.

“They were able to see, ‘This is what I need to do. Here’s how I can share the news that’s so important to me with others.’”

IBSA depends on faithful giving by Illinois Baptists to support the work we all do together—training leaders, starting new churches, and witnessing to the lost. This annual offering funds the work of IBSA missionaries and staff, such as Sandy Barnard, who has served 33 years, and one of our newest team members, multimedia journalist Andrew Woodrow. Regular giving through the Cooperative Program is the primary channel of missions giving for Southern Baptists. The Mission Illinois Offering also allows us to focus on ministries that are not funded by our national ministry partners.

Pray for generous giving in all IBSA churches today. Pray for your church’s giving through the Mission Illinois Offering, and for your own gift.

Learn more about the Mission Illinois Offering.

Watch “IBSA Annual Meeting (Recap)”

The story of a new church start in Pingree Grove starts with an IBSA-sponsored mission trip to Chicagoland, when two student groups joined two Church Planting Catalysts in prayerwalking a tiny village west of Elgin. The result is a new church starting where there was no church, as the area explodes with new homes. IBSA assists church planters across Illinois in cities and rural crossroads—everywhere the gospel is needed.

Pray for IBSA’s Church Planting Team, including Tim Bailey and Ken Wilson who saw the potential for a move of God in a place where there was only need.

Learn more about the Mission Illinois Offering.

Watch “Prayerwalking in Pingree Grove”

As Hurricane Florence slams into the southeast coast of the U.S., Disaster Relief teams prepare to minister. Floods, tornadoes, and earthquakes in distant nations all produce opportunities for the gospel. As the nation’s third-largest aid organization, Southern Baptist Disaster Relief is quickly on the scene of natural disasters. In Illinois, more than 1,600 members of IBSA churches are trained to help with flood recovery, mobile shower and laundry facilities, child care for parents as they navigate meetings with federal agencies, and spiritual counsel in their time of loss.

Pray for Illinois Disaster Relief volunteers mobilizing to serve in the wake of Hurricane Florence, and Dwayne Doyle, the IBSA Director who helps train and mobilize the mighty force of “yellow shirts” in our state.

Learn more about the Mission Illinois Offering.

Watch “Disaster Relief on Mission in Watseka” to see how Illinois Disaster Relief volunteers served during spring floods.

https://player.vimeo.com/video/264257673?title=0&byline=0&portrait=0

Our journey together

Lisa Misner —  September 13, 2018 — Leave a comment

MIO Logo 500pxBy Nate Adams

I suppose the most self-indulgent car I’ve ever owned was one we purchased just after Beth and I were married. It was a sporty little Honda Prelude, with barely any back seat and just enough trunk space for the two of us.

Then, as our family grew, we found we needed cars with bigger back seats and more trunk space. The arrival of our third son pushed us into a mini-van, and longer trips even required a cartop carrier for all the stuff that tended to go with us. Last spring, with two daughters-in-law now in our family troupe, our family vacation required the rental of something called a “people mover,” with nine seats plus cargo space.

Yes, it costs more and more and takes extra effort for a growing family to travel together. But it’s worth it. Sure, things like your destination and everyone’s comfort are important. But just as important are the relationships that grow, and the experiences you share, as you travel together.

Our journey

That’s also how I feel about our journey and mission together as churches, here in Illinois. Sure, where we are going together is important: We want to reach people with the gospel, and to develop disciples and leaders who can help our churches grow, and start new churches, and go to the mission fields of the world.

But the relationship between and among churches and leaders is important too, and somewhat unique to state and local missions. Here we are close enough, not just to do missions together, but to grow together, and sometimes hurt together, as family.

State missions isn’t only about evangelism and church planting and training leaders, though we certainly invest a lot in those priorities. It’s also helping one another through pastoral transitions, or church conflict, or legal issues. It’s doing camps together. It’s planning mission trips or experiences for multiple leaders, or kids, or students, or churches, when one church can’t do that alone.

It’s answering the phone when a church has a need, and sometimes jumping in the car to bring some help or encouragement or resources. It’s celebrating big church anniversaries together, or the long tenure of a devoted pastor. Sometimes it’s crying together at a funeral.

When churches throughout a state decide not to travel alone, but to band together, and work together, and put a state staff and ministries in place, they are doing more than giving money to send missionaries, as important as that is. They are deciding to journey together in a shared mission field, and to do life together, for better or worse, in a way that isn’t really practical in North American missions or international missions.

I would never take anything away from the challenges that our sister, southern state conventions face. But I will say that when a few hundred Southern Baptist churches that average 75 in attendance take on a northern state like Illinois, with mammoth cities like Chicago and St. Louis, and with a population that is 175 times the total worship attendance of our churches, our journey together is a little more uphill than most.

But this is our mission field. This is where we journey together. It’s not always easy or comfortable. But it’s worth it.

This week, churches across our state will receive a special offering, the Mission Illinois Offering. It helps provide what we need for the journey together. Please consider a generous gift, through your church or through the IBSA.org website, if your church isn’t receiving the offering. Every year we travel together brings new challenges. But, for the sake of the lost here, and the glory of our God, our journey together is worth it.

Nate Adams is executive director of the Illinois Baptist State Association. Respond at IllinoisBaptist@IBSA.org.

“My guy, nearby” is how the ministry of IBSA’s Zone Consultants is described. In 10 regions of the state, these experienced leaders are available to assist churches with today’s big ministry questions. Sometimes it’s enough just to have someone to listen. Other times special training is needed. In a ministry that’s unique among SBC state conventions, IBSA’s Zone Consultants bring insight on site. They offer training cohorts for pastors and one-on-one guidance for ministry equipping.

Pray for all IBSA Zone Consultants, including Larry Rhodes who serves in the Metro East St. Louis area.

Learn more about the Mission Illinois Offering.

Watch “IBSA Was There”